The office of Ivy Pierson, MBA | Phone: (661) 297-7566

Santa Clarita, California
28368 Constellation Road, Unit 396
Santa Clarita, CA 91355
(661) 297 - 7566 Phone

January 2017

What Today’s Workers Can Expect From Social Security Tomorrow

Did you know that the age at which many workers will qualify for full Social Security benefits has risen to 67 from 65? If that’s news to you, you’re not alone: The majority of workers are still in the dark about Social Security eligibility requirements and many expect to qualify for benefits payments sooner than they actually will.

Combined with lingering questions about the long-term financial health of the overall Social Security program, these facts reinforce the importance of understanding exactly what you might expect from Social Security during your retirement.

 

Benefit Basics
The exact amount of your Social Security benefit will depend upon your earnings history. According to the Social Security Administration (SSA), your benefits will be there for you when you retire. However, the SSA also acknowledges that some changes to the present system may be required.
For example, when Social Security was created, the average life span was less than 65 years. But today, many people are living longer, healthier lives. And because the nation’s 76 million baby boomers are in or approaching retirement, there will be almost twice as many older Americans in 30 years as there are today.

 

What’s in Store?
Ideally, Social Security takes in more in taxes each year than it pays out in benefits. However, based on SSA projections, by 2034, the Social Security trust fund will be insufficient to allow for full payment of scheduled benefits. Recognition of these issues is growing, and legislators are now looking at funding and investment options to resolve them.
While your Social Security benefits are an important piece of the retirement income equation, you probably shouldn’t plan to rely on Social Security alone for your future income. Your employer-sponsored retirement savings plan, company pension, and personal savings may need to provide the major portion of your income in retirement.

SOURCE
U.S. Census Bureau, “Projections of the Population by Sex and Age for the United States: 2015 to 2060,” 2014.
Social Security Administration, “Fast Facts & Figures About Social Security,” 2015.
Required Attribution:
Because of the possibility of human or mechanical error by Wealth Management Systems Inc. or its sources, neither Wealth Management Systems Inc. nor its sources guarantees the accuracy, adequacy, completeness or availability of any information and is not responsible for any errors or omissions or for the results obtained from the use of such information. In no event shall Wealth Management Systems Inc. be liable for any indirect, special or consequential damages in connection with subscriber’s or others’ use of the content.
© 2016 DST Systems, Inc. Reproduction in whole or in part prohibited, except by permission. All rights reserved. Not responsible for any errors or omissions.
Recognizing and Avoiding Online Scams

Recognizing and Avoiding Online Scams

Although online crime is a fast-moving target, currently, the primary methods in use by identity thieves are social engineering and phishing — or typically a combination of both.

According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), identity theft is the fastest growing crime in America, affecting nearly 10 million people between 2010 and 2014. Further, the 2015 Identity Fraud Study released by Javelin Strategy & Research calculated that in 2014 there was a new identity fraud victim every two seconds.

This crime occurs when a thief obtains confidential information — including passwords, personal ID numbers, Social Security numbers, or an account number used with a financial institution — and uses it to commit fraud. Identity thieves use a victim’s stolen information to open bank and brokerage accounts, run up bills for credit card purchases, obtain loans, and commit other forms of financial fraud.

Criminals obtain a victim’s personal information in a number of ways — both online and off. But as incidents of identity theft grows, so too does the arsenal of tools and sophistication level of techniques used to perpetrate the crimes.

Cybercrime: A Rapidly Shifting Model
Although online crime is a fast-moving target, currently, the primary methods in use by identity thieves are social engineering and phishing — or typically a combination of both.

As the term implies, social engineering relies heavily on human interaction and often involves tricking unsuspecting victims into breaking normal security procedures. In short, it is a way for criminals to gain access to your computer or mobile device and the sensitive personal data it stores. For instance, a social engineer may use text messaging to contact a mobile device inviting the user to click on a link to a bogus website where the thieves collect user credentials and other personal information.

Similar results can be achieved through a phishing attack, in which the criminal uses email to lure victims to fake websites and then gain access to their passwords and usernames, credit card numbers, and other key data. Phishing emails often appear to be from a legitimate company that the victim recognizes.

In yet another instance, attackers may inject infected “malicious” code onto your computer via email attachments, links contained in emails, infected search engine results, or through videos and documents on legitimate websites, particularly social networking sites. In the mobile device world, criminals can corrupt a legitimate smartphone app and upload it to a third-party site. If users innocently install the app, they expose their devices to assaults by hackers who collect personal user data, change device settings, and sometimes even control the device remotely.

Don’t Be a Victim
In today’s 24/7/365 world, it is nearly impossible to secure all sources of personal information that may be “out there” waiting to be intercepted by eager thieves. But you can help minimize your risk of loss by following a few simple hints offered by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI):

• Never divulge your credit card number or other personally identifying information over the Internet or telephone unless you initiate the communication.

• Reconcile your bank account monthly, and notify your bank of discrepancies immediately.

• Actively monitor your online accounts to detect suspicious activity. Report unauthorized financial transactions to your bank, credit card company, and the police as soon as you detect them.

• Review a copy of your credit report at least once each year. Notify the credit bureau in writing of any questionable entries and follow through until they are explained or removed.

• If your identity has been assumed, ask the credit bureau to add a statement to that effect to your credit report.

• If you know of anyone who receives mail from credit card companies or banks in the names of others, report it to local or federal law enforcement authorities.

Finally, be very wary of any email or text message expressing an urgent need for you to update your personal information, activate an account, or verify your identity. Practice similar caution with email attachments and downloadable files and keep your computers protected with the latest security updates and virus protection software.

SOURCE
“Identity Theft and Cyber Crime,” copyright 2016, Insurance Information Institute, Inc.
Required Attribution:
Because of the possibility of human or mechanical error by Wealth Management Systems Inc. or its sources, neither Wealth Management Systems Inc. nor its sources guarantees the accuracy, adequacy, completeness or availability of any information and is not responsible for any errors or omissions or for the results obtained from the use of such information. In no event shall Wealth Management Systems Inc. be liable for any indirect, special or consequential damages in connection with subscriber’s or others’ use of the content.
© 2016 DST Systems, Inc. Reproduction in whole or in part prohibited, except by permission. All rights reserved. Not responsible for any errors or omissions.
fruit

Quick Ambrosia Fruit Salad Recipe
Ingredients
* 1 can (8-1/4 ounces) fruit cocktail, drained
* 1 can (8 ounces) unsweetened pineapple chunks, drained
* 1 cup green grapes
* 1 cup seedless red grapes
* 1 cup miniature marshmallows
* 1 medium banana, sliced
* 3/4 cup vanilla yogurt
* 1/2 cup flaked coconut
Directions
1. In a large bowl, combine all ingredients. Chill until serving.
Yield: 6 Servings
SOURCE: http://www.tasteofhome.com

 

mental

5 New Year’s Resolutions That
Will Help You Build Mental
Strength In 2017

Losing weight, going to the gym, and getting healthy are among the most popular New Year’s resolutions. But, the sad reality is, most people will fail to meet their goals. Research indicates only 8% of people make their New Year’s resolutions stick.
The biggest reason people fall short of their goals is because they’re focusing on the wrong things. Your body won’t do what your mind won’t make it. So rather than focus on building physical strength, commit to building mental strength.
Developing mental muscle is the key to self-discipline, delayed gratification, grit, and perseverance. So whether your goal is to save more money or you hope to make 2017 the year you face your fears, becoming mentally stronger will help you succeed.
Here are five resolutions that will help you build mental strength this year:

 

1. I will practice self-compassion.
The way you think affects how you feel and how you behave. Beating yourself up when you make mistakes, calling yourself names, and constantly criticizing your performance will only hold you back.
Commit to developing a kinder, more compassionate inner dialogue. Talk to yourself the same way you’d speak to a trusted friend and you’ll become more motivated to create lasting change.

 

2. I will become more aware of my feelings.
Your emotions influence how you interpret events and how you make decisions. Anxiety may cause you to avoid risks and sadness may lead you to settle for less, for example.
Spend a few minutes every day thinking about how you’re feeling. Label your emotions and acknowledge that your feelings from one area of your life will spill over into other areas.
When you’re aware of how you’re feeling, you can take steps to balance your emotions with logic. Whether you’re contemplating moving to a new city or you’re thinking about applying for a new position, making good decisions is the key to becoming your best self.

 

3. I will spend at least 15 minutes per day in quiet reflection.
It’s easy to get so caught up in the hustle and bustle of life that you don’t take a single minute to think. But without a little quiet time, how do you know how you’re doing in terms of your goals?
Set aside 15 minutes every day to just think. Reflect on your day and think about what you want to do better tomorrow. Your quiet time could become the most instrumental part of your day.

 

4. I will establish a weekly goal for myself.
Establish a small, yet challenging goal for the week. Whether you want to run 10 miles or you plan to apply for two new jobs, write down your intentions. Researchshows if you write your goals down, you’ll increase your chances of success by 42%.
Get specific by setting your intentions of when and where and you’ll skyrocket your chances of success. So rather than saying, “I’ll go to the gym three times,” say, “I’ll go to the gym Monday, Wednesday, and Friday right after work.”
Each small goal you set gives you an opportunity to flex your mental muscles. With each success, you’ll build confidence and be motivated to keep going.

 

5. I will identify three things I’m grateful for every day.
Recognizing the good things in life is a simple, but effective way to build mental strength. Studies have linked gratitude to a multitude of benefits, ranging from improved sleep to reduced psychological distress.

Writing in a gratitude journal can be especially effective. Identify three things you’re grateful for each day and you’ll train your brain to start looking for the good things in life. You’ll also proactively ward off bad mental habits, like self-pity, which can rob you of mental strength.

 

Build Your Mental Muscle All Year
Mental strength training isn’t about setting one goal for yourself in January. Instead, genuine self-improvement should be about becoming a little better each day throughout the entire year.

Don’t overwhelm yourself by tackling too many goals at one time. Start with one change you want to make.

Maybe you’ll decide to start a gratitude journal in January. Then, in February, you decide to commit to creating more time for reflection. Over time, you’ll build more mental muscle and your other goals in life-fitness or otherwise-will become easier to achieve.

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